Insert photo: Kylie Jenner lips comments Credit: [thegloss.com} N.D. 2/27/16 from http://www.thegloss.com/2014/10/28/beauty/kylie-jenner-lip-plastic-surgery-photos-rumors-response-twitter/

Social media sites like YouTube and Instagram have done great things for the beauty industry over the last 10 years. Your favorite beauty vloggers and bloggers have given the industry a real relatability that you couldn’t get with beauty advertisements. Beauty brands have noticed this and nowadays almost every beauty brand has an Instagram or Twitter account. Social media has given us -the audience, the opportunity to showcase what we find to be beautiful and it’s not always the media’s and society’s usual standard of beauty. It’s become a place for us to highlight things like full figured women and models like Winnie Harlow. Social media has definitely had a positive impact on the beauty industry but what about the other side of it?

Insert photo: Bobbi-brown-beauty-tutorial Credit: [agorapulse.com} N.D. 2/27/16 from http://www.agorapulse.com/blog/social-media-management-beauty
Insert photo: Bobbi-brown-beauty-tutorial Credit: [agorapulse.com} N.D. 2/27/16 from http://www.agorapulse.com/blog/social-media-management-beauty
While beauty magazines and popular beauty brands seem to be progressing with the times not everyone is on board. A most recent example of this is the picture M.A.C. posted on Twitter of African model Aamito Lagum’s lips. Lagum was modeling their latest lipstick Royal Romance. The comments left on their Twitter page were horrendous. Everything from “I’m no longer following”, to “n*gger lips” were written on M.A.C.’s page. The comments were filled with disdain and blatant racism. So that leads us to wonder, why is it that when a white women with African American features post a picture on social media it’s praised but, when a black women is displayed with her natural features she’s highly criticized? Why the double standard?

Insert photo: MAC twitter page Credit: [blavity.com} N.D. 2/27/16 from http://blavity.com/mac-cosmestics-photo-of-black-womans-lips-causes-racist-backlash-on-instagram/
Insert photo: MAC twitter page Credit: [blavity.com} N.D. 2/27/16 from http://blavity.com/mac-cosmestics-photo-of-black-womans-lips-causes-racist-backlash-on-instagram/
According to Cosmopolitan magazine, in 2014, women wrote more than 5 million negative tweets. That tells me that not only are there racist, mean-spirited internet trolls, spilling their hate on social media, but we as women are also tearing each other down. We are contributing to destroying other women and young girl’s self-esteem as well, and it needs to stop.

Insert photo: speak beautiful Credit: [scoopnest.com} N.D. 2/27/16 from http://www.scoopnest.com/user/dailyedge/570322468826517504
Insert photo: speak beautiful Credit: [scoopnest.com} N.D. 2/27/16 from http://www.scoopnest.com/user/dailyedge/570322468826517504
In my opinion we need a redo of the Dove and Twitter #speakbeautiful campaign that was created last year. Both Dove and Twitter realized the role our words were playing in tearing down women’s confidence and self- esteem. The campaign was started to encourage people to leave positive comments instead of negative ones. This was definitely a step in the right direction but we need to do more and we need to keep it going. We are all our sister’s keeper and therefore we are all responsible for hurtful comments others write. It you see something, call that person out, let them know it’s wrong to spew hate. The power is in our hands, it’s time for a change.

Written by: Shannon Lockhart

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