Photo Credit: [untitled photo of children]. (N.D.) Retrieved January 27, 2016 from http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/lianne-castelino-and-andrea-howick/sports-parents_b_3331147.html

Photo Credit: [untitled photo of dad with daughter]. (N.D.) Retrieved January 27, 2015 from http://blog.coachup.com/2015/10/22/coachup-survey-are-you-a-bad-or-good-sports-parent/
Photo Credit: [untitled photo of dad with daughter]. (N.D.) Retrieved January 27, 2015 from http://blog.coachup.com/2015/10/22/coachup-survey-are-you-a-bad-or-good-sports-parent/
At some point you might have witnessed an adult who can be over the top at a youth game. They are yelling at their child, the coaches, the refs, and any other person that does not share their belief of how the game is being played or how their child is performing. Whether your child participates in football, basketball, soccer, track, gymnastics, dance, or any other competitive sport it is up to you to be the ideal parent when it comes to their participation. Your child is always watching and will learn by the things you do rather than what you say. Being a sport parent is can be very emotional for both you and your child and why it is so important to be mindful of your actions. To be a successful youth parent follow these helpful tips:

  1. Reflect on Your Behavior: Ask others their view of your behavior towards your child and others at sporting events and be open to what you hear and work on changes if needed.
  2. Be Encouraging: Attend your child’s games or sport event regularly, go to their practices, and make sure they have everything they need to fully participate.
  3. Know Your Role: Let your child’s coach do their job. Trust that they know what they are doing. If they are not behaving in a respectable and positive way then you can find another team to your liking and go over options.
  4. Cheer For the Whole Team: Show your child that you not only care about them but the others on the team. This will demonstrate team player skills to your child
  5. Don’t Criticize Your Child’s Mistakes Immediately: If your child has a competitive spirit they already know their mistakes and if they have a good coach they more than likely have has talked to them on how to improve.
  6. Be a Great Listener: Let your child openly talk about their performance with you when they are ready. This is when you can offer your thoughts, but be careful that you don’t just focus on their mistakes. Your child will probably surprise you and show you they can come up with their own answers to their mistakes. Just be your child’s biggest fan. Constantly let them know you love to see them participating in the sport of their choice.

Parents remember when you show these types of behaviors you make the game more fun, and exciting for you, your child, and everyone around you.

Written By: Tiffani Casurra, Staff Writer, Modern Domestic

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