Photo Cred: Ariane Hunter 2/6/2016 https://www.flickr.com/photos/drawing_with_light/6169907365
photo credit received 2/9/16 link: http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/05/08/stretch-hot-yoga/?_r=0
photo credit received 2/9/16 link: http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/05/08/stretch-hot-yoga/?_r=0

Fitness experts constantly promote new techniques to tighten and tone the body, while promising quick results in minimal time. Those desperately looking to lose weight, myself included, look to join the latest craze. While there are many ways to tighten, tone, lift and tuck; losing weight and getting in shape does not have a linear path to success. I am always open to exploring new ideas to get fit, because exercise no longer has to include a machine. My latest living social deal is hot yoga.

Hot yoga is a vigorous form of yoga performed in a heated studio of 105 F (40 C), and has a humidity of 40 percent. The formal name for hot yoga is “Bikram yoga.” Bikram yoga is a 90-minute program that consists of a series of 26 postures. The postures require lengthy, forceful and well-controlled contractions of all major muscle groups. The demanding nature of the poses are designed to raise your heart rate and tire your muscles.

I have come to appreciate hot yoga for several reasons. First, I consider it my bi-weekly detoxification, flushing out toxins and free radicals from the skin. According to Isabel Lambert, director of Tula Yoga Spa in Toronto, working in a heated room also elevates the heart rate, which makes the body work harder. “It’s really for people who want a more intense workout—those wanting to develop strength, flexibility and tone along with a cardiovascular workout.”   After each class I feel is an intense relaxation from my 9 to 5, followed by a well stretched body.

However, every new workout regime comes with a set of risks. Therefore, before starting any fitness regimen contact your physician or local health care provider.

Written by Candice Hurst

Disclaimer: The EGL Wellness blog does not create a doctor/patient relationship. The information provided is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. All text on this site is informational and for educational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified mental health provider with any questions regarding a medical condition. Do not disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this site. Any advice or information provided on the site is provided on an “as-is” basis. No warranties either expressed or implied, are made on the information provided.

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