photo credit received 4/6/16 link: http://www.ravishly.com/2016/04/01/something-finally-being-done-about-pregnancy-and-postpartum-depression

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Motherhood is one of the best blessings on earth. Holding a newborn baby in your arms gives a mother a feeling one cannot describe into words. Unfortunately, the usual bonding experienced by most can turn into a total detachment by some. This feeling of detachment is called Postpartum Depression.

What Is Postpartum Depression?

Signs and symptoms of depression after childbirth vary, and they can range from mild to severe.

Postpartum depression symptoms

Postpartum depression may be mistaken for baby blues at first — but the signs and symptoms are more intense and last longer, eventually interfering with your ability to care for your baby and handle other daily tasks. Symptoms usually develop within the first few weeks after giving birth, but may begin later — up to six months after birth.

Postpartum depression symptoms may include:

  • Depressed mood or severe mood swings
  • Excessive crying
  • Difficulty bonding with your baby
  • Withdrawing from family and friends
  • Loss of appetite or eating much more than usual
  • Inability to sleep (insomnia) or sleeping too much
  • Overwhelming fatigue or loss of energy
  • Reduced interest and pleasure in activities you used to enjoy
  • Intense irritability and anger
  • Fear that you’re not a good mother
  • Feelings of worthlessness, shame, guilt or inadequacy
  • Diminished ability to think clearly, concentrate or make decisions
  • Severe anxiety and panic attacks
  • Thoughts of harming yourself or your baby
  • Recurrent thoughts of death or suicide

Untreated, postpartum depression may last for many months or longer.

Treatments and drugs

Treatment and recovery time vary, depending on the severity of your depression and your individual needs. If you have an underactive thyroid or an underlying illness, your doctor may treat those conditions or refer you to the appropriate specialist. Your doctor also may refer you to a mental health provider.

Postpartum depression

Postpartum depression is often treated with psychotherapy (also called talk therapy or mental health counseling), medication or both.

  • Psychotherapy. It may help to talk through your concerns with a psychiatrist, psychologist or other mental health provider. Through therapy, you can find better ways to cope with your feelings, solve problems, set realistic goals and respond to situations in a positive way. Sometimes family or relationship therapy also helps.
  • Antidepressants. Your doctor may recommend an antidepressant. If you’re breast-feeding, any medication you take will enter your breast milk. However, some antidepressants can be used during breast-feeding with little risk of side effects for your baby. Work with your doctor to weigh the potential risks and benefits of specific antidepressants.

With appropriate treatment, postpartum depression usually goes away within six months. In some cases, postpartum depression lasts much longer, becoming chronic depression. It’s important to continue treatment after you begin to feel better. Stopping treatment too early may lead to a relapse.

Source: The above information was obtained via the site Mayoclinic.

Feel free to contact your local physician, clinic, therapist or health care professional regarding this topic.

Written By: Kanarian Kindred

Disclaimer: The EGL Wellness blog does not create a doctor/patient relationship. The information provided is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. All text on this site is informational and for educational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified mental health provider with any questions regarding a medical condition. Do not disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this site. Any advice or information provided on the site is provided on an “as-is” basis. No warranties either expressed or implied, are made on the information provided.

 

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